BLESSINGS FOR PEACE FROM THE HOLY WATERS OF YAMDROK LAKE

BLESSINGS FOR PEACE FROM THE HOLY WATERS OF YAMDROK LAKE

Aerial View of Yamdrok Lake in Tibet

The scenery of the Yamdrok Lake and surrounding villages in Nagarze County of Shannan, Tibet. (Xinhua/Jigme Dorje)

Placid and peaceful: enjoy the aerial view of Tibet’s holy lake, Yamdrok Lake.

SHANNAN, Sept. 2, 2019 (Xinhua) — Yamdrok Lake with an area of about 590 square km is located in Nagarze County in the city of Shannan, Tibet. It’s about 100 kilometers south of the region’s capital Lhasa.

Yamdrok Lake along with Lake Namtso and Lake Manasarovar are regarded as the three holy lakes of Tibet.

The scenery of the Yamdrok Lake in Nagarze County of Shannan, Tibet. (Xinhua/Li Xin)

The scenery of the Yamdrok Lake in Nagarze County of Shannan, Tibet. (Xinhua/Jigme Dorje

The scenery of the Yamdrok Lake in Nagarze County of Shannan, Tibet. (Xinhua/Jigme Dorje)

The scenery of the Yamdrok Lake in Nagarze County of Shannan, Tibet. (Xinhua/Li Xin)

The scenery of the Yamdrok Lake in Nagarze County of Shannan, Tibet. (Xinhua/Jigme Dorje)

The scenery of the Yamdrok Lake in Nagarze County of Shannan, Tibet. (Xinhua/Li Xin)

PRAYER TO LORD GANESHA – SUCCESS THROUGH OBEDIENCE AND HUMILITY

PRAYER TO LORD GANESHA – SUCCESS THROUGH OBEDIENCE AND HUMILITY

PRAYER TO LORD GANESHA - SUCCESS THROUGH OBEDIENCE AND HUMILITY.
PRAYER TO LORD GANESHA – SUCCESS THROUGH OBEDIENCE AND HUMILITY.
Prayer to Lord Ganesha – Success Through Obedience and Humility.On bhavanajagat.com

Indian Cultural Traditions offer tools for success in all dimensions of life including health, education, employment, social status, and social relationships. The Formula For Success is simple; perform all tasks making an estimate to take care of negative consequences or outcomes, and plan for roadblocks or obstacles in the planning stage of executing any action. Indians initiate actions seeking Blessings of Lord Ganesha for their desire for Success in Life should not be directed by intellectual pride or arrogant use of physical or material power.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-4162 USA
BHAVANAJAGAT

PRAYER TO LORD GANESHA - SUCCESS THROUGH OBEDIENCE AND HUMILITY.
PRAYER TO LORD GANESHA – SUCCESS THROUGH OBEDIENCE AND HUMILITY.
Prayer to Lord Ganesha – Success Through Obedience and Humility
Prayer to Lord Ganesha – Success Through Obedience and Humility
Prayer to Lord Ganesha – Success Through Obedience and Humility
Prayer to Lord Ganesha – Success Through Obedience and Humility
Prayer to Lord Ganesha – Success Through Obedience and Humility
A prayer to Lord Ganesha for success with humility.

LABOR DAY MUSINGS. CURSED IS THE GROUND WHERE THE MAN IS DENIED THE RETIREMENT INCOME BENEFITS

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 02, 2019. LABOR DAY MUSINGS. CURSED IS THE GROUND WHERE THE MAN IS DENIED THE RETIREMENT INCOME BENEFITS 

Monday, September 02, 2019. Labor Day Musings. The Clinton Curse Defines the American Workplace.


In the United States, Labor activists, and Labor Unions made great progress to defend the rights of Working Class. Unfortunately, President Bill Clinton undermined this progress by approving legislation that took away the dignity of unskilled, hourly wage earners who legally work in the US paying taxes. President Clinton on August 22, 1996, signed into law, Public Law 104-193, ‘The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act’ (PRWORA) which places restrictions on the payments of monthly retirement income benefits to workers in the US under Title II of the Social Security Act. Refer to Section 401(b) (2) of PRWORA.
 

Monday, September 02, 2019. Labor Day Musings. The Clinton Curse Defines the American Workplace.

For many unskilled, hourly wage earners performing labor in the US, the American Workplace is defined as Work until Death for they have no Retirement option. In other words, those who have no Retirement option, American Workplace is defined by the Book of Genesis, Chapter 3, verses 17 to 19.

Monday, September 02, 2019. Labor Day Musings. The Clinton Curse Defines the American Workplace.


I ask my readers to reflect upon the awful consequences of President Clinton’s actions on this Labor Day. Apart from alien workers, the ground gets cursed with consequences to all its denizens. The Clinton Curse compels Americans to live and work paying off their foreign debt. This nation lives on money borrowed from other nations.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada
SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

Monday, September 02, 2019. Labor Day Musings. The Clinton Curse Defines the American Workplace.

IN 1882, LABOR DAY ORIGINATED WITH A PARADE HELD IN NEW YORK CITY


 Posted on Monday, September 04, 2017 by EMILY NONKO

Clipped from: https://www.6sqft.com/in-1882-labor-day-originated-with-a-parade-held-in-nyc/

Monday, September 02, 2019. Labor Day Musings. The Clinton Curse Defines the American Workplace.

An illustration of the first Labor Day parade, via Wiki Commons

Though Labor Day has been embraced as a national holiday–albeit one many Americans don’t know the history of–it originated right here in New York City. The holiday is a result of the city’s labor unions fighting for worker’s rights throughout the 1800s. The event was first observed, unofficially, on Tuesday, September 5th, 1882, with thousands marching from City Hall up to Union Square. At the time, the New York Times considered the event to be unremarkable. But 135 years later, we celebrate Labor Day on the first Monday of every September as a tribute to all American workers. It’s also a good opportunity to recognize the hard-won accomplishments of New York unions to secure a better workplace for us today.

According to Untapped Cities, the holiday has its roots in a common 19th-century tradition in which laborers held picnics and parades to draw awareness to worker’s rights. Organized unions emerged from there, and New York City became a hotbed for labor activists by the Industrial Revolution of the 1880s.

View of South Street during the Industrial Revolution, via the Metropolitan Museum of New York

Back then, laborers were fighting against low wages, unfair hours, child labor and unsafe working environments. (Most workers at the time worked six days a week, 10 or 12 hours a day, and Sunday was the only day off. There were no paid vacations, no sick days and very few breaks during a day.) Two labor groups, the Knights of Labor and the Tailor’s Union, established a city-wide trade consortium–known as the Central Labor Union of New York, Brooklyn, and Jersey City, or the CLU–in January of 1882 to promote similar goals. They called for things like fair wages, an eight-hour workday and an end to child labor. The group also proposed that for one day a year, the country celebrates American workers with parades and celebrations. The CLU went ahead and organized the first parade for the September 5th of that year.

According to Brownstoner, two different men within the labor movement were credited for the parade. Matthew Maguire, a machinist, first proposed a holiday and parade in 1882. He was the secretary of the CLU. But that same year, Peter J. McGuire, co-founder of the American Federation of Labor, also proposed a parade. The debate between the original founder of Labor Day was never settled, though Matthew Maguire usually gets the credit.

The parade began outside City Hall, with the CLU advertising it as a display of the “strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations.” It was important to the event that the men gave up a day’s pay to partake in the festivities. And they did arrive in droves, with banners and signs with slogans like “NO MONEY MONOPOLY” and “LABOR BUILT THIS REPUBLIC AND LABOR SHALL RULE IT.”

No drinking was allowed at the parade, which featured everyone from the Jewelers Union of Newark to the typographical union, which was known as ‘The Big Six.’ Along the route, which passed Canal Street on its way to Union Square, hundreds of seamstresses hung out the windows cheering the procession, blowing kisses and waving their handkerchiefs. It’s said as many as 20,000 men marched that day.

The party after the marchers hit Union Square was celebratory, according to the New York history book Gotham. Here’s a passage from the book:

Finally, after passing by a reviewing stand filled with labor dignitaries, the participants adjourned, via the elevated, to an uptown picnic at Elm Park. There they danced to jigs by Irish fiddlers and pipers and were serenaded by the Bavarian Mountain Singers while the flags of Ireland, Germany, France, and the USA flapped in the autumn air.

Monday, September 02 2019. Labor Day Musings. The Clinton Curse Defines the American Workplace.

Labor Day parade float in New York City, early 20th century, via New York Department of Labor

Labor parades began in other cities around the county, and for a while, the day was known as “the workingman’s holiday.” By 1886, several cities had an annual parade, with the legislation in the works to make the day a state holiday. Though New York was the first state to introduce a bill to make the holiday official, Oregon was the first to actually pass it as law in 1887. New York quickly followed suit that same year, as did New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Colorado.

Labor unions, of course, went on to secure rights like the eight-hour workday, collective bargaining, health insurance, retirement funds, and better wages. These days, the holiday is better known as a marker to the end of summer than a celebration of the working class. But it’s a nice reminder such hard-fought battles, which brought accomplishments that now define the American workplace, took root in New York.

Tags: Labor Day

Monday, September 02, 2019. Labor Day Musings. The Clinton Curse Defines the American Workplace.



SPIRITUALITY SCIENCE-FREE WILL vs PREDESTINATION

SPIRITUALITY SCIENCE-FREE WILL vs PREDESTINATION

I am sharing the film review of Indian Movie ‘Anuradha'(1960) to comment upon the concepts of ‘Free Will’ and ‘Predestination’. In my view, the man has no ‘Free Will’ to define his “Essence” for his “Existence” is always conditioned by predetermined external circumstances upon which the man has no control even by changing the place of residence or place of work.

Anuradha (1960): Stalwarts Hrishikesh Mukherjee, Leela Naidu, Balraj Sahni and Pt Ravi Shankar Join Hands in Graceful Classic


Anuradha (1960) was produced and directed by the prolific Hrishikesh Mukherjee. The film had Balraj Sahni and Leela Naidu in lead roles, along with Nasir Hussain, Asit Sen, Mukri, Hari Shivdasani, Abhi Bhattacharya, David and Ranu Mukherjee. Leela Naidu had won the Miss India title and had been offered this eponymous role by Mukherjee.
The film’s music was composed by Pandit Ravi Shankar, who rarely composed music for Bollywood films. The film was based on a story by Sachin Bhowmick that was published in the Bengali magazine Desh. The film went on to win the National Film Award for Best Feature Film and was nominated for the Golden Bear at the 11th Berlin International Film Festival in 1961.
A noted radio singer and dancer Anuradha Roy (Leela Naidu) falls in love with an idealistic doctor, Dr. Nirmal Chowdhary (Balraj Sahni). Her father is against this relationship as he feels that there is a wide gap between his status as a wealthy man and that of the doctor of humble origins and meager means.
Dr. Nirmal was her brother Ashim’s friend. They had met in a saree store. When Anu sprains her ankle after a performance, Dr. Nirmal treats her. Her father Brijeshwar Prasad Roy (Hari Shivdasani) is biased against Dr. Nirmal but his family doctor assures him that Dr. Nirmal is competent.
So enchanted is Anu with her lover that she is willing to give up everything for him.
Anu decides to marry Dr. Nirmal against her father’s will. Nirmal’s mother had died without adequate medical help. Since then he has this burning desire to serve the rural poor so that no one meets his mother’s fate. He decides to serve the poor in a distant village called Nandagaon. He cautions Anu about the life of hardship that she would have to endure with him.
But Anu decides to throw caution to the winds. She marries him and follows him to the village. Her father had plans to get her married to the London-returned Deepak (Abhi Bhattacharya). Deepak is magnanimous when he comes to know of Anu’s love with Dr. Nirmal. He promises to help her in the future in case she needs any help.
After her marriage, Anu is blessed with a daughter. But soon life becomes monotonous and humdrum. Anu gets busy with the household chores and quits singing. Ten years later, Anuradha is a homebody with a life characterized by drudgery. Her husband is forever preoccupied with his patients. He has little time for his wife. He forgets to take her to the village festival she had been excitedly looking forward to.
After many years, her father visits her and requests her to relocate to the city. He is unable to see his daughter in financial distress. But Dr. Nirmal refuses the offer.
Deepak meets with an accident while traveling with his girlfriend. Dr. Nirmal successfully operates on his girlfriend and Deepak lands up in Dr. Nirmal’s home where he is tended by Anu with lots of care and affection. He realizes the hardships the once-rich girl has to endure in a remote village. He suggests that she leave Nirmal and move to the city to lead a life of luxury and comfort. Dr. Nirmal agrees to this proposal. Maybe Anu can start her singing career all over again. So what decision does Anuradha take? Does she leave her husband and go out in pursuit of a singing career that can give her name, fame, and prosperity? Or is she satisfied leading the life of a homemaker?
Lyricist Shailendra wrote the lyrics for timeless classics like “Hai Re Who Din Kyon Na Aaye”, “Bahut Din Huye”, “Kaise Din Beete, Kaise Beeti Ratiyan”, “Sanware Sanware Kahe Mose” and “Jane Kaise Sapno Mein”.
“Haye re wo din’ was based on raga Janasammohini – a variant of the more common Kalawati.
 Anuradha is a film about the common man and the problems that he faces in his day-to-day life. Here the spotlight is on the housewife. The story of a young woman who gives up her dreams to be with the love of her life is not a common script in Bollywood. Similar themes resonated in films like Abhinetri (Hema Malini & Shashi Kapoor) and Anubhav (Sanjeev Kumar & Tanuja) but the treatment was completely different.
Characters like the man who falls sick thinking about his wife (Mukri) or the man on a diet who cannot resist sweets (Asit Sen) or Ram Bharose (Rashid Khan), the conductor of the bus, who engages in idle conversation with Dr. Nirmal are lovable and believable. They add sparkle to the plot that otherwise runs the risk of becoming mundane.
Balraj Sahni’s acting skills are legendary and well-documented and therefore do not need any special mention. He is one of the finest actors in Indian cinema. His restrained performance in Anurdaha is exemplary. This is Leela Naidu’s debut but she delivers her role with so much conviction that you start believing in the trials and tribulations of Anuradha. What you see on the screen is not Naidu but Anuradha Roy – melancholic and desolate, pining for her lost love and struggling to deal with the loneliness unsuspectingly bestowed on her.
Ranu Mukherjee (playback singer Hemant Kumar’s daughter) plays Anuradha’s daughter. Mukherjee has shown glimpses of domestic life that lend authenticity to the narrative (like Anuradha tucking in a mosquito net around her child’s bed) or the sound of dogs howling late at night.
The film raises an important question. Should a woman sacrifice her career for her love? Will giving up on your dreams lead to happiness?
A complex film that manages to portray a marital relationship sensitively, Leela Naidu’s exquisite beauty and effervescent charm add immense value to the plot. Actresses like Nargis or Nutan could have enacted the role but then Anuradha would not have been the classic as it is touted to be today. Considering Nargis had done Lajwanti with Sahni and Nutan had done Sone Ki Chidiya and Seema with Sahni, the novelty value would have been lost.
Leela Naidu was unique – an intellectual woman who strayed into Bollywood for a brief while – blithe about the name, fame, and money associated with the film industry. Surprisingly, both Naidu and Sahni share great screen chemistry despite the fact that Naidu was just 20 years old and Sahni was much older than her.
Mukherjee had the knack of making extraordinary films about ordinary people and Anuradha is symbolic of his directorial ability and editorial panache. Dialogues are simple and devoid of any cinematic touches.
The ending may appear trite but if a woman really loves a man, she may just leave everything and follow him. The argument about home or career after a woman’s marriage is still considered relevant but there are so many illustrious personalities who have given up their flourishing career to make peace at home. Anuradha could have still continued her singing at home with a little encouragement from Dr. Nirmal who ought not to have taken his wife for granted. A woman’s marriage must not lead to the end of her career aspirations but then how many women are lucky to sail both the boats at the same time?
(After working in the corporate world for close to two decades, Bhagyalakshmi started her second career innings as a head-hunter. She is passionate about Hindi movies and loves retro music. When her family shifted to Chennai in the ’80s, Bhagya had a taste of Tamil cinema too. In the long term, she plans a book on two of her favorite directors – Guru Dutt and K Balachander. She travels across the country on work and is based in Mysore.)
Thanks for sharing this film review. I was in School in 1960 and had no time to spend watching movies.
I like the title of the movie for it relates to my belief in Hindu Astrology that names 27 stars or “Nakshatras”. The name “Anuradha” refers to ‘the disciple of divine spark’. Indian traditions attach personalities to various celestial objects including the Sun and Moon.
I have chosen the name Doom Dooma for I got married while serving in Doom Dooma, Tinsukia District, Assam. The marriage has predicted the “doom” of my medical career, the career that I rejected in July 1986.
I made the decision to leave my doctor’s career to keep the marriage that has given me two children named Ashwini, and Anuradha. I believe in the principle of predestination, a principle that does not sanction freewill to the man. People may think that I am making my own choice and have given up my options to pursue my doctor’s career. The predestination acts in a mystical manner. It alters the external circumstances forcing the man to choose a predetermined course of action.
Anuradha gave up her singing career to seek marital bliss in the company of a doctor. I gave up my doctor’s career to maintain a marital relationship. The choices are similar. But, I reconcile to the choice for I have no ability to change the external circumstances that compel me to change the direction of my life’s journey.

Image result for anuradha 1960 movie

SPIRITUALITY SCIENCE. COMPASSION CANNOT BE RECRUITED

SPIRITUALITY SCIENCE. COMPASSION CANNOT BE RECRUITED. WHO IS THE FATHER OF COMPASSION?

Spirituality Science. Compassion cannot be recruited. Love, Compassion, and Forgiveness demand the God Connection, the connection to the original source of Love, Compassion, and Forgiveness.

There are two basic problems with the current medical education and health care policy that formulates the delivery of medical services to people. Medical Science has not yet defined the meaning of the term called man. “What is Man?” Without answering that question, we will not be able to answer the question, “What is Health?”

Unlike His Holiness the Dalai Lama, I recognize the man as a created being. I speak about compassion after identifying the source of the behavioral response identified as compassionate care.

The natural healing mechanism called Repair and Inflammation is a divine gift and it guides me to reflect upon Providence or Divine Mercy, Grace, and Compassion that formulates human existence both in good health as well as ill-health.

Spirituality Science. Compassion cannot be recruited. Dr. William James, Father of Psychology defines ‘True Ideas’.

I cannot validate, I cannot verify, I cannot corroborate, and I cannot assimilate the ideas shared by Gyatso Tenzin, the 14th Dalai Lama, and Dr. Ralph Snyderman, the “Father of Personalized Medicine” on compassion and its role in health care. Their basic assumptions about compassion are fundamentally flawed for the following reasons:

1. Compassion is neither a desire nor an emotion. The acts or behavioral response called compassion does not involve thoughts or thinking process.

Spirituality Science. Compassion cannot be recruited. Compassion is neither Acquired nor Learned Behavior.

2. Compassion cannot be recruited and it cannot be imparted or acquired through the learning process or educational experience.

3. The existence of man as well as that of all living things at all stages of their existence at any given time or place is dependent upon the Divine Providence which is the original source of compassion. The experience called compassion is dependent upon ‘God Connection’ for the man’s Existence always precedes his Essence.

4. The primary role of a Physician is that of promoting good and positive health. The medical interventions are of secondary importance.

Rudra Narasimham Rebbapragada

Bhavanajagat.org

https://bhavanajagat.com/2010/05/20/philosophy-of-medicine/

Recruiting The Dalai Lama To Bring Compassion Back Into Medicine

  AUG 9, 2019

THE TWO EVIL DOCTRINES TORMENTING INDIA FROM THE VERY BEGINNING

THE TWO EVIL DOCTRINES TORMENTING INDIA-TIBET RELATIONS FROM THE VERY BEGINNING

Image result for the british divide and rule policy

India gained full independence in 1947 but is besieged with two evil doctrines tormenting her from the very beginning. On one hand, India faces an insurmountable problem due to the evil doctrine of the ‘Divide and Rule’ policy of the British Empire to systematically weaken India using Pakistan as a hostile force. On the other hand, India faces a very serious threat to her security by the evil doctrine of ‘Expansionism’, the State policy of Communist China which replaced the Imperialist China in 1949. Apart from Pakistan’s invasion and occupation of Kashmir, India faces the difficult challenge to defend the entire Himalayan Frontier which basically existed for several centuries with no troops guarding the border.

Image result for Chairman Mao Zedong's expansionist doctrine

I entirely agree with Indian Prime Minister Nehru’s assessment made in 1953. India lacks the military capabilities to intervene in Tibet to counter Communist China’s Expansionist Policy.

Rudra Narasimham Rebbapragada

Special Frontier Force

Review: Will Tibet Ever Find Her Soul Again? by Claude Arpi

Claude Arpi’s new book is particularly relevant as China rolls out the Belt and Road Initiative

BOOKS Updated: Apr 05, 2019 17:59 IST

Thubten Samphel

Thubten Samphel

Hindustan Times
A view of Lhasa, Tibet, on March 27, 2019.
A view of Lhasa, Tibet, on March 27, 2019.(VCG via Getty Images)
578pp, Rs 1550; Vij Books

578pp, Rs 1550; Vij Books

The brilliance of new China’s leaders in pursuing their hard-nosed strategic objectives in Tibet was to weave a plausible narrative of ‘liberation’ around what was an outright invasion of the country. The other twist in the narrative was to force Lhasa to sign the 17-Point Agreement in 1951 in which Tibet promised to “return voluntarily to the lap of the motherland.” Half the world, largely the socialist camp, bought China’s story on Tibet.

The process of dealing with China’s fait accompli on the Roof of the World was particularly painful in the corridors of power in New Delhi. Should close cultural, commercial bonds and an open, unguarded border between India and Tibet blindside New Delhi to the changed new geopolitical reality in which the balance of power between independent India and new China had shifted in Beijing’s favor?

In dealing with the issue of Tibet, the two Asian giants brought two different mindsets. India had hoped, as articulated by Nehru, de-colonizing Asia and Africa would come together as one big family to work for common prosperity and peace. China on the other hand was there for itself, in whatever form that enduring Chinese imperial impulse was dressed up in the reigning ideology of the day.

The clash of views of men on the ground who figured out China’s true intentions in Tibet and beyond and those who took Beijing’s comforting words at their face value are put together in Will Tibet Ever Find Her Soul Again? The value of Claude Arpi’s contribution to scholarship on the subject is that it is based on the Nehru papers housed in the Nehru Memorial Library and Museum and the National Archives of India. “It is the first time such documents have been used (or even seen),” says Arpi.

At the time these events unfolded in Tibet, New Delhi’s man in Lhasa was Sumul Sinha. In his briefing to New Delhi about Chinese intentions, he wrote: “It seems to me that we are not facing fairly and squarely the realities of the situation here, inclined as we are to gloss over Chinese dislike and distrust for insignificant aliens like us, for no better reason than to keep Delhi in good humour and to keep alive the illusions of our policy-makers who still believe that much maligned Chinese are just as good today as they were in the past.”

Author Claude Arpi

Author Claude Arpi ( Courtesy the author )

In his briefing note to Major SM Krishnatry, the Indian Trade Agent in Gyantse, Sinha was brutally honest. He accused the People’s Liberation Army of doing a Robert Clive act on Tibet. “I hardly think that Chinese officials in Tibet can help being adventurous nor do I blame them for dreaming of conquest far beyond the confines of Tibet. They are physically placed at the outskirt of an empire and has happened in so much of history, think and behave like modern Clives and Hastings, always anxious to out-do their own achievements.”

In this Great Game played out between independent India and re-united China, Arpi’s ability to piece together all the confidential memos and exchange of notes in high places serve as a fly on the wall. His contribution on the subject will serve as a guide for new players not to repeat the mistakes of the past. With China rolling out the almost globe-girdling Belt and Road Initiative to improve sea and land connectivity to purportedly facilitate international trade but also to assert its political influence on the countries strung along the new Silk Road, the Great Game is being played with new vigour. Arpi’s contribution constitutes a playbook for the participants in the new Great Game, now rebranded and re-sold as the Belt and Road Initiative.

Image result for twin threats to India's security

THE US-CHINA TRADE WAR. MY REFLECTIONS ON PRESIDENT NIXON’S ORIGINAL SIN

THE US-CHINA TRADE WAR. MY REFLECTIONS ON PRESIDENT NIXON’S ORIGINAL SIN

The term ‘sin’ is portrayed using a variety of terms. The biblical writers describe sin as that condition and activity of human beings that is offensive to God. Sin is a revolt against holiness and sovereign will of God. It is both a condition of the heart, mind, will, affections and the practical outworking of that condition in thoughts, words, and deeds that offend God and transgress His holy law. In secular terms, sin means any offense against good morals, any offense against established law of the Land, and any violation of standard code for human behavior and action.

THE FOUNDING PRINCIPLES OF THE UNITED STATES

WHOLE DUDE - WHOLE SIN : Sin is that condition of the heart, mind, will, affections and the practical outworking of that condition in thoughts, words, and deeds that offend this Declaration of Independence and sin is any action that transgress the intent of this Declaration of Independence upon which the nation called the United States of America is created.
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: Sin is that condition of the heart, mind, will, affections and the practical outworking of that condition in thoughts, words, and deeds that offend this Declaration of Independence and sin is any action that transgresses the intent of this Declaration of Independence upon which the nation called the United States of America is created.

The Declaration of Independence adopted July 04, 1776 to pronounce the creation of the United States spells in very clear, and transparent terms the American ideal of Government based on the Theory of Natural Rights. This Declaration states the philosophy of Human Freedom and the Nation and its Government is formed by Social Contract. The United States and its elected officials who represent the entity called Government have to adhere to these founding principles and they must be guided by the Laws of Nature which guarantee inalienable rights of man.

Governments are instituted among men to secure their unalienable rights and Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed. And for the support of this Human Freedom, we must mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor. In this context, I would like to define the term “WHOLE SIN” as a condition of the heart, mind, will, affections and the practical outworking of that condition in thoughts, words, and deeds that offend the Declaration of Independence and transgress the Laws of Nature.

REMEMBERING NIXON-KISSINGER VIETNAM TREASON:

Memorial is anything that serves to help people to remember some person or event. I would like to share the photo images of the Vietnam Veterans War Memorials to remind people that we fought these wars to contain the threat posed by Communism to the doctrine of Human Freedom, and the Rule of Governance called Democracy.

Whole Dude - Whole Sin : Remember the Vietnam War. America called its sons and daughters to pledge their Lives, their Fortunes and their sacred Honor to fight the Enemy called Communism.
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: Remember the Vietnam War. America called its sons and daughters to pledge their Lives, their Fortunes, and their Sacred Honor to fight the Enemy called Communism.

WHOLE DUDE - WHOLE SIN - SAN ANTONIO TEXAS VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL . This monument reminds people that the sons and daughters of the United States of America have pledged their Lives, their Fortunes, and their sacred Honor to defend Human Freedom, and Democracy and fought the Enemy called Communism.
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL. This monument reminds people that the sons and daughters of the United States of America have pledged their Lives, their Fortunes, and their Sacred Honor to defend Human Freedom, and Democracy and fought the Enemy called Communism.

THE ORIGINAL SIN OF NIXON AND KISSINGER:

WHOLE DUDE - WHOLE SIN : The prophesy revealed by Father Moses in The Old Testament, The Fifth Book of Moses, The Book of Deuteronomy, Chapter 28, verses 47 to 50 has come true in the lives of American people. The RED DRAGON, The People's Republic of China, The Communist nation is the Enemy that Americans will be forced to serve like slaves.
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: The prophecy revealed by Father Moses in The Old Testament, The Fifth Book of Moses, The Book of Deuteronomy, Chapter 28, verses 47 to 50 has come true in the lives of American people. The RED DRAGON, The People’s Republic of China, the Communist nation is the Enemy that Americans will be forced to serve as slaves.

WHOLE DUDE - WHOLE SIN : The photo image evidence for the "Original Sin." Chairman Mao Zedong, and Prime Minister Zhou-Enlai are guilty of the crime called "GENOCIDE." The UN Convention of 1949 defined the crime of Genocide; the systematic destruction by government of a racial, religious, or ethnic group. Dr. Henry Alfred Kissinger of National Security Affairs is guilty of the crime called the misuse and abuse of power. His sinful actions represent the violation of the Supreme Law established by the Constitution of The United States of America. He usurped the powers entitled to the Secretary of State. He conducted secret diplomacy before he was administered the oath to the Office and before he pledged his allegiance to the Constitution.
My reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: This photo image is the evidence for the “Original Sin.” Chairman Mao Zedong, and Prime Minister Zhou-Enlai are guilty of the crime called “GENOCIDE.” The UN Convention of 1949 defined the crime of Genocide; the systematic destruction by government of a racial, religious, or ethnic group. Dr. Henry Alfred Kissinger of National Security Affairs is guilty of the crime called the misuse and abuse of power. His sinful actions represent the violation of the Supreme Law established by the Constitution of The United States of America. He usurped the powers entitled to the Secretary of State. He conducted secret diplomacy before he was administered the oath to the Office and before he pledged his allegiance to the Constitution.

In the history of the nation called The United States of America, President Richard Milhous Nixon(37th president of the US 1969-1974), and Dr. Henry Alfred Kissinger( initially appointed by President Nixon in 1969 as an Adviser, National Security Affairs and later the Secretary of State from September 1973-1977) are guilty of the offense called ‘The Original Sin’ for they transgressed the Supreme Law of this nation.

We have to recognize China’s Cultural Revolution of 1966 – 1969 as a mass campaign sponsored by the Communist government to commit “GENOCIDE.” Many thousands died and there was no proper accounting of the atrocities committed and there was never a full inquiry of this human tragedy. The Cultural Revolution officially ended in 1969, but we all know that many of its excesses continued until the death of Communist Party leader Mao  Tse-Tung in 1976.

In the words that I chose from The Old Testament, The Fifth Book of Moses, The Book of Deuteronomy, Chapter 28, verses 47 to 50, I describe their actions of “WHOLE SIN” and its consequences as follows:

“Because you did not serve the LORD your God joyfully and gladly in the time of prosperity, therefore in hunger and thirst, in nakedness and dire poverty, you will serve the enemies the LORD sends against you. The LORD will bring a nation against you from far away, from the ends of the Earth, like an eagle swooping down, a nation whose language you will not understand, a fierce-looking nation without respect for the old or pity for the young.” 

I would like to share some of these photo images that reveal the transgression of Natural Law and its consequences. The people of The United States of America failed to serve the LORD GOD joyfully and gladly in the time of prosperity, will now serve the Enemy that LORD sent against them.

WHOLE DUDE WHOLE SIN : February 21, 1972. President Richard Nixon with Communist leader Mao-Tse Tung in Peking(Beijing). Chairman Mao represents the Face of Crimes Against Humanity.
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: February 21, 1972. President Richard Nixon with Communist leader Mao-Tse Tung in Peking(Beijing). Chairman Mao represents the Face of Crimes Against Humanity. The UN Convention of 1949 has defined the crime of Genocide as systematic destruction by a government of a racial, religious, or ethnic group. When this photo was taken, the United States was officially engaged in a battle in Vietnam to contain the direct threat posed by Communism. China’s Communist Party leader represents the face of that Enemy.

WHOLE DUDE - WHOLE SIN : Communist China's Premier Zhou En-Lai and the US National Security Adviser Dr. Henry Alfred Kissinger are the faces that represent the Original Sin, they are guilty of the offense called transgression of Law.
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: Communist China’s Premier Zhou En-Lai and the US National Security Adviser Dr. Henry Alfred Kissinger are the faces that represent the Original Sin, they are guilty of the offense called transgression of Law. William P. Rogers was the Secretary of State from 1969 to 1973. Dr. Kissinger had usurped the powers of the Secretary of State and had misused and had abused his office to conduct secret diplomatic negotiations with the Enemy while the United States was openly fighting a grim battle to contain the threat of Communism in Vietnam.

WHOLE DUDE - WHOLE SIN : December 01, 1975. President Gerald Ford with Deng Xiaoping in Beijing. George Herbert Walker Bush who later became CIA's Director on January 30, 1976 is also seen in this photo. Both President Ford and George Bush were fully aware of America's partnership with India, and Tibet to fight the military threat posed by Communism.
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: December 01, 1975. President Gerald Ford with  China’s Communist leader Deng Xiaoping in Beijing. George Herbert Walker Bush who later became CIA’s Director on January 30, 1976, is also seen in this photo. Both President Ford and George Bush were fully aware of America’s partnership with India, and Tibet to fight the military threat posed by Communism.

Whole Dude - Whole Sin
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: January 30, 1979. The White House Ceremony. President James Earl Carter(39th president of the US 1977-1981) with Chinese Communist Party leader Teng Hsiao Ping. Does the Declaration of Independence envisage friendly relations with the Communists?

Whole Dude-Whole Sin-April 26-1984-President Li Xiannian-President Ronald Reagan-Peking
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: April 26, 1984. President Ronald Wilson Reagan(40th president of the US 1981-1989) with China’s Communist Party leader and President Li Xiannian. President Reagan, who demanded the tearing down of the ‘Berlin Wall’, must have avoided the immoral friendship with the Communists.

Whole Dude -Whole Sin
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: February 25, 1989. President George Herbert Walker Bush(41st president of the US 1989-1993) riding the bike given by China’s Communist Party leader, Premier Li Pang in Beijing. President Bush who had earlier served as the Director of CIA is fully aware of the US military alliance/pact with India, and Tibet to face the military threat posed by Communist China’s occupation of Tibet since 1950.

Whole Dude - Whole Sin-June 27 1998
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: June 27, 1998. President William Jefferson Clinton(42nd President of the US 1993-2001) with China’s Communist Party leader and Premier Li Peng in Beijing. A willingness to serve the Enemy.

Whole Dude - Whole Sin
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: February 21, 2002. President George W. Bush(43rd president of the US) with China’s Communist Party leader, President Jiang Zemin in Beijing. Communist China’s lack of respect for Human Rights should deter the United States from pursuing this path of self-destruction.

Whole Dude - Whole Sin
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: Friday, June 07, 2013. President Barack Obama with China’s Communist Party leader and President Xi Jinping. The prophecy predicted in the Book of Deuteronomy, Chapter 28, verses 47-50 is coming true.

Whole Dude - Whole Sin
My Reflections on President Nixon’s Original Sin: Saturday, June 08, 2013. Rancho Mirage, California. President Barack Obama with China’s Communist Party leader, President Jiang Zemin. The word ‘Mirage’ describes an Optical Illusion, something that falsely appears to be real. American Citizens have to wake up to the reality of the Enemy who has arrived on their shores from a distant land. ( The Book of Deuteronomy, Chapter 28, verses 47-50.)

The Supreme Law of the United States of America is called The Constitution of The United States of America. The Constitution was preceded by The Declaration of Independence, the written document that pronounced the creation of the nation called The United States of America. I am respectfully claiming that the elected representatives and other officials that constitute the Government have transgressed the Laws of the nation when they began the unholy relationship with Communist China which is opposed to Human Freedom, and the principle of governance by Social Contract called Democracy.

Rudra N. Rebbapragada, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A.,

Organization: Special Frontier Force.  

 

 

THE NATURAL REALITY CALLED TIBET

THE NATURAL REALITY CALLED TIBET:

TIBET IS NEVER A PART OF CHINA

Image result for natural reality of tibetan plateau
 
In my analysis, the Tibetan Identity, the Identity of the Land and all of its denizens is predetermined, predestined, and is defined by Nature; by Natural Causes, Natural Forces, Natural Conditions, Natural Mechanisms, and Natural Factors.
 
Tibet is never a part of China. It may be correct to claim that China is inside Tibet due to the unjust, unfair, and illegal occupation using brute military force which is trying to mask the Natural Reality called Tibet.
 
Rudra Narasimham Rebbapragada
SPECIAL FRONTIER FORCE

A REFLECTION

A trip to Tibet: Whose country is it anyway?

By Peter Fabricius• 16 August 2019

 Tibetan performers dance the Tibetan traditional Guozhuang dance during the opening ceremony of Naqu Horse Racing Festival in Naqu country, Tibet, China, 10 August 2013. The Naqu Horse Racing Festival is held during August 10 to 14 attracting local Tibetan horse riders to compete in traditional equestrianism and display their horse-riding skills. It also as an opportunity for Tibetan families to gather enjoying their leisure time. EPA/WU HONG  

“Seeing is believing,” China’s ambassador to South Africa Lin Songtian said before we left for Tibet. His idea was that the visit would dispel the Western-propagated, anti-Chinese myths about this controversial – what to call it, country? – for many Tibetans. For the Chinese government, it is the “Tibet Autonomous Region” (TAR) of China.

There is much to see and marvel at in Tibet, though believing is inevitably a little more complicated. Certainly, it’s easy to see why Tibetans love their country and why some (who knows how many?) would like it to be just Tibet.

The majestic backdrop of the soaring misty snow-capped peaks of the Himalayas and its foothills, disgorging countless churning rivers and streams to rush through grassy uplands dotted with shaggy yaks to the distant sea, the monumental Potala Palace and the Jokhang Temple with its golden roofs in Lhasa … all these and more give this place its unique character as “The Roof of the World” – in the words of tourist brochures.

The night lit Potala Palace as it towers over the city of Lhasa, one of the highest cities in the world and the capital of Tibet, 18 October 2011. TEPA/BARBARA WALTON

The South African journalists and academics on this trip can attest to the loftiness of Tibet. Lhasa perches at 3,600 meters (twice as high as Johannesburg) in the Himalayan foothills. One day we climbed to 5,200 meters (just shy of the summit of Kilimanjaro, for comparative purposes) to reach the shimmering iridescent blue lake of Namtso. Our hosts considerately provided a large cylinder of oxygen in our bus at all times so we could gulp high-octane air when altitude sickness threatened.

There were also oxygen canisters in our hotel rooms in the aptly named Shangri-La Hotel, which also boasted an “oxygen lounge” where one could breathe oxygenated air.

Like their landscape, the Tibetan people are quite distinct, ethnically and culturally, with their own language; their own, often fervent, a brand of Buddhism; their physical appearance, with coppery-bronze skin color; and their unique clothing and customs.

Does this distinct identity not justify the demand for self-determination – or at least a greater measure of it – by the Dalai Lama and his government-in-exile in India, I asked at the China Tibetology Research Center in Beijing.

Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama (C) attends a Long Life offering prayer, at the main Buddhist temple of Tsuglagkhang, near the town of Dharamsala, India, 17 May 2019.  EPA-EFE/SANJAY BAID

Yao Maochen, the curator of the museum of Tibetan culture at the center, acknowledged that, according to original Marxist doctrine, different ethnic groups do have to the right to seek independence and said the Communist Party of China (CPC) explored this possibility before it came to power in 1949.

“But, for the country and society, stability comes first,” Yao added. “On the one hand, we have to respect the identity of ethnic groups. But, on the other hand, we have to maintain national stability because only with national stability can peace, happiness and development become possible.”

To discuss ethnic independence theoretically was meaningless, he said, without putting it in the context of not only of China’s national stability but also its national law – which makes splitting up the country illegal. Independence for any part of China would also be contrary to the will of the majority of the Chinese as it would violate the Chinese tradition of different ethnic groups working together against foreign aggression and coexisting “like the seeds of a pomegranate”.

According to Sam van Schaik in his “Tibet; A History”, Mao Zedong himself argued in the 1930s that Tibetan, Mongol and Muslim minorities should be allowed independence, but by the 1940s his view had hardened to offering them just autonomy within China. Van Schaik thought Mao came to believe China would be much safer defending its southwestern flank behind the towering Himalayas than it would be doing so on the exposed banks of the Yangzi and other rivers.

These arguments, however, put China’s interests before Tibet’s, one might counter. What about the Tibetans? China does have one big argument for why it was also in the interest of Tibet’s people that China entered Tibet in 1951 and began a process of “peaceful democratic reform”.

It says it did so to emancipate most Tibetan people from serfdom under what it calls the feudal theocracy of the 14thDalai Lama (the same man the world now knows simply as “the Dalai Lama”, though he is the latest in a long line of Dalai Lamas who governed Tibet with lesser or greater success from 1543 – until he fled into exile in 1959).

The Exhibition Hall on the Emancipation of Tibet from Serfdom in Lhasa’s Tibet Museum of Natural Science tells horrific illustrated stories of atrocities allegedly conducted by the feudal masters – the landlords, senior government officials and high lamas (or religious leaders) – against the serfs. These include photographs of manacled and shackled people sweating in the fields, living in animal pens and “suffering savage punishments, including cutting off hands or feet and even peeling off skins”.

The photographs show instruments that were allegedly “used to gouge out eyes of the serfs”’, along with a “scorpion cave to torture serfs”.

The museum avers that 5% of the ruling class owned 95% of the wealth of society.

The exhibition suffers from inattention to chronological detail. For instance, our guide was unable to say when the photographs were taken. Were conditions still so atrocious when China entered in 1951 or had they improved by then?

What is not in dispute is that Tibet was a feudal society under the Dalai Lamas (and before them), with most citizens bonded to landlords and unable to sell their labor on an open market; i.e. virtual slaves.

The Chinese did indeed emancipate the population, seizing the land of theocrats and handing it to workers. Several senior officials we met proudly told us “my father was a serf”.

“The serfs are now masters of their own destiny” was a slogan we heard from many officials.

The government in Beijing has also brought broader development to Tibet, including several new towns, 90,000kms of roads, several new railways – including extending the mainline from Beijing to reach Lhasa – five modern airports, an electric power grid that reaches 2.19 million people or 70% of the population. And so on. The scale of infrastructural development is typically Chinese: monumental.

Ambassador Lin is particularly proud of the fact that the national government has made a special effort to elevate much of the road and railway networks to allow animals such as yak and Tibetan antelope, to move freely beneath them across their ranges.

Tibetan Buddhist monks debate Buddhism in the courtyard of the Sera monastery in Lhasa, one of the highest cities in the world and the capital of Tibet, 18 October 2011.  EPA/BARBARA WALTON

Beijing and the government of the Tibet Autonomous Region have also focussed on education, raising primary school enrolment to 99.64% and decreasing illiteracy from 95% in the early 1950s to less than 0.57% today, according to government statistics.

Nine years of compulsory education are provided in all counties and 15 years of free education in agricultural and pastoral areas and to the disadvantaged.

Officials like to say life expectancy has doubled under Chinese rule, from 35.5 years in 59 to 70.6 today. Medical treatment is cheap for all and free for the needy.

Tibet’s gross domestic product was 147,76 yuan (or RMB) last year, which, in a population of some 3.4 million and with a current exchange rate of about seven yuan to the US dollar, gives a GDP per capita per annum of about $6,154.

Wang Daiyuan, Head & Research Fellow, Institute of Economic Studies of the Academy of Social Science in Lhasa, described this as being “just under” China’s overall GDP per capita.

Most statistics put the latter at about $9,770, so Tibet has some way to go. Wang’s explanation is that Tibet is still catching up after a slow start and, helped by Beijing’s emphasis on developing its outlying areas, its GDP is growing faster than that of any other region and it will match the national average in a two to three years.

His colleague Duoqing, head of the academy’s Institute of Rural Economic Studies, notes that the number of Tibetans still living in poverty has been brought down from 850,000 a few years ago to 150,000.

The government intends to reduce that number to zero by the end of this year, through its targeted poverty alleviation strategy. “Targeted”, as he underscores, means the authorities have to know the reasons for the poverty of each of those 150,000 people.

The strategy includes industrial development (though avoiding damage to the pristine environment); resettlement of farmers in more fertile areas; better education, including scholarships; ecological stewardship – in the form of government-paid jobs to take care of grasslands and rivers; providing for the basic needs of elderly; and skills training.

We saw varied examples of Beijing’s developmental interventions, including a free home in Lhasa for elderly people who have no family to care for them; a yak-meat agro-business where the hydroponic growth of barley feed for the animals is controlled remotely from Beijing, and a barley-beer brewery where the young entrepreneur gets 100,000 yuan a year from the central government to train college graduates to run pubs he is establishing to sell his product.

But if Beijing has brought impressive general development to Tibet, has it also preserved and nurtured the unique Tibetan culture? This includes the Buddhist religion, which arrived there 1,400 years ago and was inextricably intertwined with its politics – until the Peoples’ Republic moved in in 1951?

During the early years, peaking with Mao’s disastrous Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution in the late 1950s and early 1960s, many monasteries, and Buddhist artifacts were destroyed in the orgy of iconoclastic pillaging that ravaged China, Van Schaik notes.

China came to realize that to compete with the Dalai Lama on the world stage, and in Tibet itself, it had to reinvent itself as a custodian of Tibetan culture, including Buddhism.

Now it boasts of spending large amounts of money on preserving and maintaining Tibetan cultural relics – including more than two billion yuan from 2001 to 2015, with another 1,8 billion-plus earmarked for 2016 to 2020.

It says it has allocated funds and gold and silver to maintain and protect some of Tibet’s fabulous temples and monasteries such as Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple, the ornate former Dalai Lama’s summer residence Norbulingka and the equally historic Sakya monastery.

Tibetan spiritual leader Dalai Lama greets a child as he meets with supporters after his arrival at the Bilderberg Parkhotel in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 14 September 2018, EPA-EFE/ROBIN UTRECHT

More than 40 million yuan has gone on a 20-year project to revise and publish the ancient Tibetan Buddhist canons, Kangyur and Tengyur.

Critics complain that China is in reality “Sinofying” Tibet. They point out that, despite notable achievements in education, teaching in the Tibet language does not continue until the end of schooling, so pupils must go to the Chinese mainland to complete their education.

It is also claimed that China is diluting Tibetan ethnicity by bringing in large numbers of settlers from the ethnic Han group, which is dominant in China.

Zhang Yun, director of the Institute of Tibetan History Studies at the China Tibetology Research Center, denies the latter charge, insisting that 3.13 million (or 92%) of the total 3.43 million population of the Tibet Autonomous Region’s remains ethnic Tibetan. Han number only 30,000, with other ethnic minorities making up the rest. He says the ethnic ratio has remained largely unchanged since the 1950s.

Deciding who owns, or ought to own, a particular territory is usually a fraught exercise. China’s assertion is that Tibet has been part of China since the Yuan dynasty conquered Tibet in 1290. But Van Shaik points out that the “Yuan dynasty” is more accurately described as a Mongol invasion of both China and Tibet under Kubilai Khan and that when the Ming dynasty overthrew the Mongols – in China itself – in 1368, the Chinese regarded this as a return to Chinese rule.

It is true that in 1720 the Manchu dynasty entered Tibet with a force comprising Manchus, Chinese, Tibetan and Mongol troops to oust the brutal Junghar Mongol faction. Ironically, their purpose was to restore the seventh Dalai Lama to his throne.

The Manchus maintained a presence in Tibet for decades after that, but ruled, if that is the word, mostly by proxy through Tibetan proconsuls. So, the relationship between Tibet and China has always been hard to define.

How would Tibet have fared if the Chinese had stayed out in 1951 and the Dalai Lama had remained in charge? He was just 16 when the People’s Liberation Army crossed the border, having been enthroned aged five in 1940. Photographs show an understandably bewildered-looking boy on the throne of power.

China now portrays him as a grasping politician, not the spiritual leader portrayed by him and the West. It’s true that Dalai Lamas have always been political as well as religious leaders. The “Great Fifth” Dalai Lama, as he is called, was not above enlisting Mongol warriors to slaughter adherents of rival Buddhist sects and put him in charge in the 17th century.

Van Schaik paints the current Dalai Lama as a moderate figure who, despite his tender years, in 1951 felt that Marxism was closer to his Buddhist humanitarian ideals than was traditional Tibetan society.

He and then-moderate Mao got on well at first, trying to reform Tibet, before a combination of Mao’s sudden about-turn into the excesses of the Great Leap Forward and violent resistance to land reform by some Tibetan monks and other landowners sparked an uprising that forced the Dalai Lama to flee to India.

Now, aged 84, he is reportedly very ill. The Dalai Lama succession is a complex and mystical process, involving a search for the young boy who is believed to have received the reincarnated soul of the previous incumbent.

The names of a few likely candidates are inscribed in ivory, placed in a golden urn and drawn at random to identify the new Dalai Lama. But this choice, many of our official interlocutors insisted, has to be approved by Beijing.

The message seemed to be that Beijing will have the final say in choosing the 15thDalai Lama. How that will go down in Lhasa, is hard to say. DM

Peter Fabricius traveled to Tibet with a group of South African journalists and academics as a guest of the Chinese government

Image result for natural reality of tibetan plateau

COMPASSION: IS IT VOLUNTARY OR INVOLUNTARY BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE?

COMPASSION: IS IT VOLUNTARY OR INVOLUNTARY BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE?

Image result for what is the original source of compassion

In my view, Compassion is a natural, automated response generated in a person who truly experiences the feelings of grief and sorrow while actually witnessing a person or another living entity suffering on account of grief or sorrow. Compassion is neither learned nor acquired by exposure to educational experience or academic training. A professional actor can display a range of emotional responses including those of grief or sorrow. However, such enactment of behavioral response with features of grief or sorrow does not represent compassionate behavior.

In my analysis, a person who is insensitive to grief or sorrow often fails to respond in the natural, automatic manner to external stimuli. The insensitivity of the person can be attributed to his alienation, estrangement, separation, aloofness, ignorance, or distancing himself from his own true or real human nature.

To provide compassionate care or service, the person needs to discover his own true or real Self, the image in which God created man, giving or sharing with man His own Nature full of Grace, Mercy, and Compassion. To demonstrate Compassion, man has to get connected to the original source of Compassion

Image result for genesis 1:27 

Why I Spoke with the Dalai Lama About Compassion in Medicine

I distinctly recall the moment I decided to become a physician.  I was sitting on a bench in the hallway of Coney Island Hospital in Brooklyn, besides my aunt and older cousin, as we waited for the physicians to complete their examination of my beloved grandmother, in her early 90s, who was seriously ill.  She doted on all of her grandchildren, particularly me, as I was the youngest.  I loved my grandmother dearly.  I recall seeing the doctors, dressed in their white uniforms, emerge from her room, holding her life in their hands.  They eagerly reported what turned out to be good news, and thankfully, she lived over a year, and I entered the path to spend my life as a physician.  Clearly, what drove me into the field of medicine was the compassion these doctors exhibited—their sincere desire to care for and improve the lives of others.  

Amazingly, thirty-seven years later, I found myself as chancellor for health affairs at Duke University and dean of the Duke University School of Medicine where I oversaw the selection of our medical students.  The school was in an enviable position of having thousands of applicants with the highest academic standards for a class of 100 students.  While maintaining the most rigorous standards for scholastic achievement, we selected only those who convincingly demonstrated their compassion to serve the needs of others.  But, what has become apparent to me is that the sincere desire to deliver compassionate care—what drives most individuals to become physicians—is greatly challenged by the rigor and difficulties of medical education and even more so by the current practice of medicine.  Many factors are responsible for this, including the increasingly technical nature of medicine, the shortage of time available to engage with patients, and the ongoing bureaucratic issues needed for compliance.  However, the lack of focus on compassion, the basic emotion bringing physicians to medicine, has, in my view, greatly reduced the joy of practicing medicine and the benefits that physicians can bring to their patients.  Importantly, the lack of deep meaningful engagement between physicians and patients also greatly diminishes the value of care as patient behavior changes to achieve the best outcome is greatly dependent on the physician-patient relationship. 

Being committed to developing more effective, proactive, personalized models of care delivery, I have become increasingly interested in developing approaches to care that maximize compassionate interaction between the patient and their physician, while increasing the effectiveness and enjoyment of this engagement.  This being the case, I sought the opportunity to discuss compassion with the most recognized expert in compassion in the world, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama.  Join me in learning what resulted from this meeting and how compassion can be brought back to the practice of medicine in my recent Academic Medicine Invited Commentary.

By Ralph Snyderman, MD

R.S. is James B. Duke Professor of Medicine and Director, Center for Personalized Health Care, Duke University School of Medicine, and chancellor emeritus, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Further Reading

Snyderman, R. Compassion and health care: A discussion with the Dalai Lama [published online ahead of print March 12, 2019]. Acad Med. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000002709.

1 Comment
Rudra Narasimham Rebbapragada

What are the differences between voluntary actions and involuntary actions?
The article gives an incorrect impression about actions described as the delivery of compassionate care. The problem arises, as the author makes no distinction between voluntary actions and involuntary actions. The behavioral response characterized as compassionate care is always initiated as an involuntary response to an external environmental stimulus that evokes the feelings of sorrow, or grief. In other words, I cannot display any compassionate action in any given situation without experiencing grief or sorrow which acts as a trigger to elicit the response.

PERSONALIZED MEDICINE-THE VERIFICATION OF PERSONALIZED EXPERIENCE

PERSONALIZED MEDICINE- THE VERIFICATION OF PERSONALIZED EXPERIENCE

Image result for what is the meaning of compassion

I am very pleased to read the article published by Dr. Ralph Snyderman, the Director of the Duke Center for Personalized Health Care. I want to reproduce the statement that attracted my attention.
“While maintaining the most rigorous standards for scholastic achievement, we selected only those who convincingly demonstrated their compassion to serve the needs of others.”
Compassion is not an emotion that can be enacted by an actor. To qualify as a true, personal, subjective experience, the expression of compassion can only be verified by objective evidence. The person expressing compassion has to suffer mentally to share the pain and misery of another individual who is suffering at the time the instinct or innate response identified as compassion comes into play.
I ask Dr. Snyderman to share the methodology used by him to verify that the student applicants have convincingly demonstrated their compassion to serve the needs of others. 
I am not claiming that the demonstration of compassion cannot be objectively verified. At a minimum, the student applicants must be observed by checking their emotional response while they are in real physical contact with person/s experiencing pain and misery. For example, student applicants can be observed while they respond to the victims in a natural disaster zone or at the Emergency Care Center of a hospital when the victims of pain arrive for medical attention. I have to observe and verify the fact of sorrow expressed by student applicants for the sufferings of another person or another living entity in a painful or miserable condition.
Rudra Narasimham Rebbapragada
BHAVANAJAGAT.ORG

I distinctly recall the moment I decided to become a physician.  I was sitting on a bench in the hallway of Coney Island Hospital in Brooklyn, besides my aunt and older cousin, as we waited for the physicians to complete their examination of my beloved grandmother, in her early 90s, who was seriously ill.  She doted on all of her grandchildren, particularly me, as I was the youngest.  I loved my grandmother dearly.  I recall seeing the doctors, dressed in their white uniforms, emerge from her room, holding her life in their hands.  They eagerly reported what turned out to be good news, and thankfully, she lived over a year, and I entered the path to spend my life as a physician.  Clearly, what drove me into the field of medicine was the compassion these doctors exhibited—their sincere desire to care for and improve the lives of others.

Amazingly, thirty-seven years later, I found myself as chancellor for health affairs at Duke University and dean of the Duke University School of Medicine where I oversaw the selection of our medical students.  The school was in an enviable position of having thousands of applicants with the highest academic standards for a class of 100 students.  While maintaining the most rigorous standards for scholastic achievement, we selected only those who convincingly demonstrated their compassion to serve the needs of others.  But, what has become apparent to me is that the sincere desire to deliver compassionate care—what drives most individuals to become physicians—is greatly challenged by the rigor and difficulties of medical education and even more so by the current practice of medicine.  Many factors are responsible for this, including the increasingly technical nature of medicine, the shortage of time available to engage with patients, and the ongoing bureaucratic issues needed for compliance.  However, the lack of focus on compassion, the basic emotion bringing physicians to medicine, has, in my view, greatly reduced the joy of practicing medicine and the benefits that physicians can bring to their patients.  Importantly, the lack of deep meaningful engagement between physicians and patients also greatly diminishes the value of care as patient behavior changes to achieve the best outcome is greatly dependent on the physician-patient relationship.

Being committed to developing more effective, proactive, personalized models of care delivery, I have become increasingly interested in developing approaches to care that maximize compassionate interaction between the patient and their physician, while increasing the effectiveness and enjoyment of this engagement.  This being the case, I sought the opportunity to discuss compassion with the most recognized expert in compassion in the world, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama.  Join me in learning what resulted from this meeting and how compassion can be brought back to the practice of medicine in my recent Academic Medicine Invited Commentary.

By Ralph Snyderman, MD – featured on the Academic Medicine Blog

R.S. is James B. Duke Professor of Medicine and Director, Center for Personalized Health Care, Duke University School of Medicine, and chancellor emeritus, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina.

Further Reading

Snyderman, R. Compassion and health care: A discussion with the Dalai Lama [published online ahead of print March 12, 2019]. Acad Med. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000002709.

 ›

comments on “Why I Spoke with the Dalai Lama About Compassion in Medicine”
  1.  

    “We selected only those who convincingly demonstrated their compassion to serve the needs of others.”

    I would like to know the methodology involved in verifying compassion demonstrated by students applying for admission to the Medical School.

    Compassion is viewed as an innate trait and it comes into play when the individual comes to witness the pain and misery that is being experienced by another living entity. At a minimum, to demonstrate the trait called compassion needs the verification by observing the interaction between the student applicant and a victim enduring a very painful situation that impacts the viewer.

    Image of Ralph Snyderman with the Dalai Lama.