INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY – TRIBUTE TO HELEN KELLER AND HER MIRACLE WORKER


INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY – TRIBUTE TO HELEN KELLER AND HER MIRACLE WORKER – FINDING PERFECT SOUL IN IMPERFECT BODY

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY – MARCH 08, 2016 – TRIBUTE TO HELEN KELLER AND HER MIRACLE WORKER FOR FINDING “USEFULNESS OF WHOLE SOULS IN IMPERFECT BODIES.”

United Nations Day for Women’s Rights and International Peace is celebrated as International Women’s Day on Tuesday, March 08, 2016. On this occasion, I pay my respectful tribute to Ms. Helen Keller(b. Tuscumbia, Alabama) and her instructor Anne Sullivan Macy(b. Feeding Hills, Massachusetts). Keller was blind and deaf from the age of two. On March 03, 1887, Keller was put in the care of Anne Sullivan Macy who became her teacher and lifelong companion. Macy transformed her Deaf-Blind student into a Reader, Speaker, and Writer. In 1904, Keller graduated from Radcliffe College with honors. Both of them helped to promote the newly founded(1921) American Foundation for the Blind. I pay my tribute to both of them using  Keller’s words; I commend them for their service to humanity by finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

In Indian tradition,  Soul is thought of as Divine Perfection while the Physical Being is subject to various imperfections like defects, deformities, and consequences of disease and aging. God is viewed as Male aswell as Female. God is often worshiped as Mother, and Father Principle. In my view, celebration of International Women’s Day is not about empowering women. It is about recognizing Woman as source of Life, Energy, and Knowledge that makes human existence possible.

Rudranarasimham Rebbapragada
Ann Arbor, MI 48104-4162 USA
BHAVANAJAGAT.ORG

 

International Women’s Day – March 08, 2016 – Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker for Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

This Day in History: 03/03/1887 – Helen Keller meets her miracle worker

On this day in 1887, Anne Sullivan begins teaching six-year-old Helen Keller, who lost her sight and hearing after a severe illness at the age of 19 months. Under Sullivan’s tutelage, including her pioneering “touch teaching” techniques, the previously uncontrollable Keller flourished, eventually graduating from college and becoming an international lecturer and activist. As a baby, a brief illness, possibly scarlet fever, left Helen unable to see, hear or speak. She was considered a bright but spoiled and strong-willed child. Her parents eventually sought the advice of Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone and an authority on the deaf. He suggested the Kellers contact the Perkins Institution, which in turn recommended Anne Sullivan as a teacher. Sullivan, age 20, arrived at Ivy Green, the Keller family estate, in 1887 and began working to socialize her wild, stubborn student and teach her by spelling out words in Keller’s hand. Initially, the finger spelling meant nothing to Keller. However, a breakthrough occurred one day when Sullivan held one of Keller’s hands under water from a pump and spelled out “w-a-t-e-r” in Keller’s palm. Keller went on to learn how to read, write and speak. With Sullivan’s assistance, Keller attended Radcliffe College and graduated with honors in 1904. Helen Keller became a public speaker and author; her first book, “The Story of My Life” was published in 1902. She was also a fundraiser for the American Foundation for the Blind and an advocate for racial and sexual equality, as well as socialism. From 1920 to 1924, Sullivan and Keller even formed a vaudeville act to educate the public and earn money. Helen Keller died on June 1, 1968, at her home in Westport, Connecticut, at age 87, leaving her mark on the world by helping to alter perceptions about the disabled.

HELEN KELLER MEETS HER MIRACLE WORKER

    • Author:History.com Staff

    • Website Name: History.com

    • Year Published: 2009. Publisher: A+E Networks

On this day in 1887, Anne Sullivan begins teaching six-year-old Helen Keller, who lost her sight and hearing after a severe illness at the age of 19 months. Under Sullivan’s tutelage, including her pioneering “touch teaching” techniques, the previously uncontrollable Keller flourished, eventually graduating from college and becoming an international lecturer and activist. Sullivan, later dubbed “the miracle worker,” remained Keller’s interpreter and constant companion until the older woman’s death in 1936.
Sullivan, born in Massachusetts in 1866, had firsthand experience with being handicapped: As a child, an infection impaired her vision. She then attended the Perkins Institution for the Blind where she learned the manual alphabet in order to communicate with a classmate who was deaf and blind. Eventually, Sullivan had several operations that improved her weakened eyesight.
Helen Adams Keller was born on June 27, 1880, to Arthur Keller, a former Confederate army officer and newspaper publisher, and his wife Kate, of Tuscumbia, Alabama. As a baby, a brief illness, possibly scarlet fever, left Helen unable to see, hear or speak. She was considered a bright but spoiled and strong-willed child. Her parents eventually sought the advice of Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone and an authority on the deaf. He suggested the Kellers contact the Perkins Institution, which in turn recommended Anne Sullivan as a teacher.
Sullivan, age 20, arrived at Ivy Green, the Keller family estate, in 1887 and began working to socialize her wild, stubborn student and teach her by spelling out words in Keller’s hand. Initially, the finger spelling meant nothing to Keller. However, a breakthrough occurred one day when Sullivan held one of Keller’s hands under water from a pump and spelled out “w-a-t-e-r” in Keller’s palm. Keller went on to learn how to read, write and speak. With Sullivan’s assistance, Keller attended Radcliffe College and graduated with honors in 1904.
Helen Keller became a public speaker and author; her first book, “The Story of My Life” was published in 1902. She was also a fundraiser for the American Foundation for the Blind and an advocate for racial and sexual equality, as well as socialism. From 1920 to 1924, Sullivan and Keller even formed a vaudeville act to educate the public and earn money. Helen Keller died on June 1, 1968, at her home in Westport, Connecticut, at age 87, leaving her mark on the world by helping to alter perceptions about the disabled.

  • International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker for Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

© 2016, A&E Television Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker for Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Year Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker for Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker for Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker for Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker for Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker Anne Sullivan for Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.” Stamp issued in 1980.

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller, Anne Sullivan, Edith Wharton, Emily Bissell, Frances Perkins and Dolley Madison  For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”
International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”
International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

 

International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker For Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”

 

International Women's Day Tribute
International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan. Perfect Souls in Imperfect Bodies.

 

International Women's Day Tribute
International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan. Perfect Souls in Imperfect Bodies.

 

International Women's Day Tribute
International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan. Perfect Souls in Imperfect Bodies.

 

International Women's Day Tribute
International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan. Perfect Souls in Imperfect Bodies.

 

International Women's Day Tribute
International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan Macy. Perfect Souls in Imperfect Bodies.

 

International Women's Day Tribute
International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan Macy. Perfect Souls in Imperfect Bodies.

 

#March08 #InternationalWomensDay #HappyInternationalWomensDay #Liberated #RaiseHands #PraiseTheLORD EXPRESSION OF JOY FOR PERFECT SOUL AND PERFECT BODY. PRAISE THE LORD WITH UPLIFTED HANDS.
#March08 #InternationalWomensDay #HappyInternationalWomensDay #Liberated #RaiseHands #PraiseTheLORD EXPRESSION OF JOY FOR PERFECT SOUL AND PERFECT BODY. PRAISE THE LORD WITH UPLIFTED HANDS.
International Women's Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker Anne Sullivan Macy for Finding "Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies."
International Women’s Day Tribute to Helen Keller and Her Miracle Worker Anne Sullivan Macy for Finding “Usefulness of Whole Souls in Imperfect Bodies.”
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